Archive for the ‘craft’ Category

3-D Labyrinth on a Sphere

Thursday, April 30th, 2009

I wish I remembered which book I found this in, or I would list the title.  This is a classical 7-circuit labyrinth on a tennis ball.  Start with the seed pattern in the center.  The second photo shows how you can measure out some of the lines horizontally so you can get the lines the same width apart.   The last part of the seed pattern is the entrance, that ended up being a bit large.  So I drew a daisy and arrow to show where to enter the labyrinth.

How to Create a Christmas Light Labyrinth

Monday, December 1st, 2008

This labyrinth was created in my backyard last year.  It was a test for when I created one at my church and only had one hour of setup, and had to do it without any drop cloth or pattern to follow (see photo below).  I’m going to explain to you how to create a Christmas light labyrinth.  But first I have to say something about safety.

Figure 1

I’m a bit of a loose canon when it comes to electricity.  I know you’re suppose to follow the ratings on the Christmas lights, as to how many you can link together.  Electricians may also talk about how many you can hook into one outlet, or even outlets on the same circuit breakers.   Check the directions and the ratings of your lights and follow them carefully.   Now on to the fun stuff.

In this example I did a 4 circuit (4 circle) labyrinth based on the Chartres labyrinth style.  I didn’t do any measurements in advance so I didn’t know if I’d have enough lights.  If you’re handy with geometry, you could calculate the circumference of the circles and add extra for the back tracking.

To create a labyrinth using Christmas lights, simply follow the path with a coil of lights on your right (blue line, Fig.1) and a coil of lights on your left (red line, Fig.1)  When you get to a section where the line stops, simply backtrack and continue to follow the path.


Bead Labyrinth – Twelve Circuit Chartres, Directional Color

Friday, October 24th, 2008
This is the third in a series of using beads to walk the labyrinth anywhere.  I came across this idea on Karen’s Labyrinth Web Page “Walk The Labyrinth Anywhere with Beads”How does it work?  In my first article “Walking the Labyrinth with Beads – Six Circuit Chartres” I used the example with I used 2 colors and 2 shapes with a 6 circuit labyrinth.   In my second example, Bead Labyrinth – Twelve Circuit Chartres, 2 Colors, I used 2 colors and 2 sizes with a 12 circuit Chartres labyrinth. In this example, I use 4 different colors to mark directions, and 2 sizes with  the 12 circuit Chartres labyrinth.

Why use different colors and shapes for the beads? By combining sizes and colors you can make a bead counter (similar to a rosary or prayer bead system) to walk a labyrinth in any space.

What do the sizes mean? In the picture on the left you can see the photo of the beads.  The design uses plastic pony beads.  The small regular pony beads represent the smaller turns that take up a quarter of the circle.  The larger beads with shapes, represent the paths that walk half the circle before turning.

What do the colors mean? There is a meaning to each color bead.  Each bead is color coded to the compass direction that the quarter or half turn ends at.  There are several traditions that honor the four compass directions and have a color designated for each one.  Traditions such as Native American, Chinese Shamanic, and Wicca  use: yellow=east, south=red, west=blue, north=green.  In the picture on the right, you can see these colors in the letters for each of the compass directions.  You may have noticed that the picture on the right is a 12 circuit Chartres labyrinth, rotated counter-clockwise 90 degrees from how it is normally viewed.  This is because often the opening path faces east (which is a symbol for new beginnings).  In order to show the color beads coordinated to the proper directions, it made it easier to rotate the labyrinth.

On the left is the bead pattern.  On the right is the 12 circuit Chartres design color coordinated to match the beads. To follow the bead pattern start at the top and follow the beads clockwise.  The yellow bead at the top shows that you start in the East.

If you are creating this bead pattern, and the beads don’t have an orientation for direction, you may want to select the first be to be something different.  In this example, I turned all the shapes to follow the pattern clockwise.  I wish I would have put a penny in the picture to show the size of this bead pattern.  It is about 3-4 inches across in diameter.  This makes it highly portable.

Bead Labyrinth – Twelve Circuit Chartres, 2 Colors

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2008

This is the second in a series of using beads to walk the labyrinth anywhere.  I came across this idea on Karen’s Labyrinth Web Page “Walk The Labyrinth Anywhere with Beads”

How does it work?  In my first article “Walking the Labyrinth with Beads – Six Circuit Chartres” I used the example with a 6 circuit labyrinth.   In this example I will use 2 colors and 2 sizes and use a 12 circuit Chartres labyrinth.  Below on the left you can see the photo of the beads.  The design uses plastic pony beads.  The small regular pony beads represent the smaller turns that take up a quarter of the circle.  The larger beads (the flowers) represent the paths that walk half the circle before turning.

There is a meaning to each bead in the color.The darker colors (purple beads) represent turning inward to the circle.  The lighter color (light blue) represent turning outward of the center of the circle.  On the left is the bead pattern.  On the right is the 12 circuit Chartres design color coordinated to match the beads. To follow the bead pattern start at the top and follow the beads clockwise (the dark purple flower at the top of the beads is just for decoration).

If you are creating this bead pattern, and the beads don’t have an orientation for direction, you may want to select the first be to be something different.  In this example, the first bead actually has sparkles in it, but you can’t see it in the picture. I wish I would have put a penny in the picture to show the size of this bead pattern.  It is about 3-4 inches across in diameter.  This makes it highly portable.

Bead Labyrinth – Six Circuit Chartres

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2008

I came across this idea on Karen’s Labyrinth Web Page “Walk The Labyrinth Anywhere with Beads” It took me awhile to figure it out, but I knew it was powerful.  The idea is that rather than having a labyrinth to physically walk on, you can walk it in any space using beads that mark the design.

How does it work?  There are several ways to do this.  Let me start by showing you the 6 circuit Chartres labyrinth using 2 colors and 2 sizes.  Here is a design using plastic pony beads.  The small regular pony beads represent the smaller turns that take up a quarter of the circle.  The larger beads (the hearts) represent the paths that walk half the circle before turning.

There is a meaning to each bead in the color.The darker colors (purple pony beads, and the dark pink heart beads) represent turning inward to the circle.  The lighter color (light pink) represent turning outward of the center of the circle.  On the left is the bead pattern.  On the right is the 6 circuit Chartres design color coordinated to match the beads. To follow the bead pattern start at the top and follow the beads clockwise (the dark purple flower at the top of the beads is just for decoration).

I wish I would have put a penny in to show the size of this bead pattern.  It is only about 2-21/2 inches across in diameter.  This means it’s highly portable.  Using a labyrinth can be very soothing, even in bead form.  It is very similar to carrying worry beads or a rosary with you.

Canvas Labyrinth

Monday, September 29th, 2008

This is a canvas Chartres labyrinth for laying on the floor in a small space and walking on top of it.  The cloth is about 3 feet by 3 feet (sharpie pen for scale)  I used 6 different colors on each circle to keep track of which circle you were walking.  I came up with this idea after reading Karen’s website on making walkable labyrinths in a small space.  She drew the the lines for the labyrinth, and then drew a colored pattern in each path between the lines.  I opted to skip drawing the traditional lines, and just drew the colored paths.

You might be wondering why there is such a large center.  If you try to make a normal scaled Chratres laybrinth you will find that the turns in the center are two tight to make a meditative walk.  By making the paths thin and on the edges of the cloth, it opens up the turns.

After walking this design I found that it wasn’t quite the same as walking a full scale Chartres.  I guess I’ll never be happy until I have a 12 circuit design between 30-50 feet :)  I found myself concentrating on the turns, and then cruising the arcs.  Again there’s another metaphor for life in here.  You set for a goal, and end up with unexptected turns and back tracking before reaching your final destination.

Wood Burned Labyrinth

Monday, September 29th, 2008

My first attempt at a wood burned labyrinth.  Pen for scale.  Both wood circle and wood burning tool was purchased at my local craft store.